What are the benefits of working with English Teaching China?

Many of the other organisations offering teaching placements in China will offer only some if any of the benefits we offer.

Also it is worth knowing that speaking Chinese is not required, Chinese students are encouraged not to speak any Chinese during an English teaching class.

No upfront fees

We wont charge you any Upfront Fees

£500 after 12 Months

After you've completed your 12 month's teaching get £500 towards initial visa and TEFL costs

Free

Free flights and airport pick up

Free

certified CPD (continued professional development) to improve your CV

Free

ongoing support with a real person before and during the length of your contract

Minimum

salary of ¥15,000 – ¥20,000

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Who can apply for our ETC Program in China?

All you need in order to qualify is a sense of adventure, a recognised degree and passport from either the UK, Ireland, USA, Canada, Australia, South Africa or New Zealand.

You do not require any previous teaching experience with our program. What you will need to do is complete a quick online TEFL in order to qualify for a Z (working) Chinese visa.

Real Support

We know how daunting it can be to travel halfway around the world and start up a new life. Another advantage to our ETC Program is that you will deal with real people throughout your time on our program. One of our advisors will initially guide you through the application process and help you to choose a suitable English teaching position in China

Piece of Mind

We know that you will have many questions after your arrival in China and throughout your stay. We therefore will team you up with a more experience teacher who you can contact in times of difficulty or just simply to ask for support in carrying out your new duties.

An Exciting New Culture

Its not just a job…

APPLY NOW

Great Wall of ChinaLength: 21.19618 million m

The Great Wall of China is a series of fortifications made of stone, brick, tamped earth, wood, and other materials, generally built along an east-to-west line across the historical northern borders of China to protect the Chinese states and empires against the raids and invasions of the various nomadic groups of the Eurasian Steppe with an eye to expansion.

Great Wall of ChinaLength: 21.19618 million m

The Great Wall of China is a series of fortifications made of stone, brick, tamped earth, wood, and other materials, generally built along an east-to-west line across the historical northern borders of China to protect the Chinese states and empires against the raids and invasions of the various nomadic groups of the Eurasian Steppe with an eye to expansion.

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Forbidden CityBuilt 1406–1420

The Forbidden City is a palace complex in central Beijing, China. The former Chinese imperial palace from the Ming dynasty to the end of the Qing dynasty (the years 1420 to 1912), it now houses the Palace Museum. The Forbidden City served as the home of emperors and their households as well as the ceremonial and political center of Chinese government for almost 500 years.

Constructed from 1406 to 1420, the complex consists of 980 buildings[2] and covers 72 hectares (over 180 acres).[3][4] The palace exemplifies traditional Chinese palatial architecture,[5] and has influenced cultural and architectural developments in East Asia and elsewhere. The Forbidden City was declared a World Heritage Site in 1987,[5] and is listed by UNESCO as the largest collection of preserved ancient wooden structures in the world.

Since 1925, the Forbidden City has been under the charge of the Palace Museum, whose extensive collection of artwork and artifacts were built upon the imperial collections of the Ming and Qing dynasties. Part of the museum's former collection is now in the National Palace Museum in Taipei. Both museums descend from the same institution, but were split after the Chinese Civil War. Since 2012, the Forbidden City has seen an average of 15 million visitors annually, and received more than 16 million visitors in 2016[6] and 2017.[1]

Forbidden CityBuilt 1406–1420

The Forbidden City is a palace complex in central Beijing, China. The former Chinese imperial palace from the Ming dynasty to the end of the Qing dynasty (the years 1420 to 1912), it now houses the Palace Museum. The Forbidden City served as the home of emperors and their households as well as the ceremonial and political center of Chinese government for almost 500 years.

Constructed from 1406 to 1420, the complex consists of 980 buildings[2] and covers 72 hectares (over 180 acres).[3][4] The palace exemplifies traditional Chinese palatial architecture,[5] and has influenced cultural and architectural developments in East Asia and elsewhere. The Forbidden City was declared a World Heritage Site in 1987,[5] and is listed by UNESCO as the largest collection of preserved ancient wooden structures in the world.

Since 1925, the Forbidden City has been under the charge of the Palace Museum, whose extensive collection of artwork and artifacts were built upon the imperial collections of the Ming and Qing dynasties. Part of the museum's former collection is now in the National Palace Museum in Taipei. Both museums descend from the same institution, but were split after the Chinese Civil War. Since 2012, the Forbidden City has seen an average of 15 million visitors annually, and received more than 16 million visitors in 2016[6] and 2017.[1]

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Li RiverGuangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region

The Li River or Li Jiang (Chinese: 漓江; pinyin: Lí Jiāng) is a river in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China. It flows 83 kilometres (52 mi) from Guilin to Yangshuo, where the karst mountains and river sights highlight the famous Li River cruise.

The Li River originates in the Mao'er Mountains in Xing'an County and flows in the general southern direction through Guilin, Yangshuo and Pingle. In Pingle the Li River merges with the Lipu River and the Gongcheng River and continues south as the Gui River, which falls into the Xi Jiang, the western tributary of the Pearl River, in Wuzhou.

Tourist rafting boats cruises from Xingping on the Li River
The upper course of the River Li is connected by the ancient Lingqu Canal with the Xiang River, which flows north into the Yangtze; this in the past made the Li and Gui Rivers part of a highly important waterway connecting the Yangtze Valley with the Pearl River Delta.

The 437-kilometre (272 mi) course of the Li and Gui Rivers is flanked by green hills. Cormorant fishing is often associated with the Lijiang (see bird intelligence).

Tourist boat cruises from Guilin to Yangshuo are famous, attracting millions of visitors a year.[1

Li RiverGuangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region

The Li River or Li Jiang (Chinese: 漓江; pinyin: Lí Jiāng) is a river in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China. It flows 83 kilometres (52 mi) from Guilin to Yangshuo, where the karst mountains and river sights highlight the famous Li River cruise.

The Li River originates in the Mao'er Mountains in Xing'an County and flows in the general southern direction through Guilin, Yangshuo and Pingle. In Pingle the Li River merges with the Lipu River and the Gongcheng River and continues south as the Gui River, which falls into the Xi Jiang, the western tributary of the Pearl River, in Wuzhou.

Tourist rafting boats cruises from Xingping on the Li River
The upper course of the River Li is connected by the ancient Lingqu Canal with the Xiang River, which flows north into the Yangtze; this in the past made the Li and Gui Rivers part of a highly important waterway connecting the Yangtze Valley with the Pearl River Delta.

The 437-kilometre (272 mi) course of the Li and Gui Rivers is flanked by green hills. Cormorant fishing is often associated with the Lijiang (see bird intelligence).

Tourist boat cruises from Guilin to Yangshuo are famous, attracting millions of visitors a year.[1

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Still Interested?

Contact us today to show your interest and one of our team will get back in touch or Simply Apply Now and Submit your CV